Fashion

Fashion (110)

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Fashion or Flop: The Walk of Shame

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Did you ever look at somebody’s outfit and think…there’s a story behind that look.

Whatever the details are behind this particular outfit, we’re sure the designer had one thought in mind: The Walk of Shame.

For those who don’t know what the walk of Shame is…or are to ashamed to admit it…it’s that early morning still wearing the same clothes from last night (only more rumpled) look that people wear when generally after they’ve made a bad decision. It usually involves an excess of alcohol and a serious lack of good judgement.

With that in mind, look at this guy. Look at that hastily modified bedsheet he’s wearing…the greasy ponytail…the socks tied over his shoes. It’s shame on two heels.

 

 

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International Woolmark Prize 2017/18

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Matthew Miller and Bodice - from the British Isles and India - are the winners of the menswear and womenswear 2017/2018 International Woolmark Prize, presented at a special event during Pitti Uomo at Stazione Leopolda in Florence. In addition, the USA’s DYNE was announced the winner of the inaugural Innovation Award.

The award was judged by a highly esteemed panel, including Amber Valletta, Elizabeth Von Guttman, Emanuele Farneti, Julie Davies, Livia Firth, Liya Kebede, Miroslava Duma, Nonita Kalra, Phillip Lim, Riccardo Vannetti, Sarah Mower and Stuart McCullough along with representatives from the International Woolmark Prize retail partner network.

“Today we saw the world’s best emerging designers present a true celebration of fashion design and innovation, as they shone the spotlight on Australian Merino wool,” said The Woolmark Company Managing Director Stuart McCullough. “Each year, the competition has been fierce and this year was no different. I would also like to commend the mills and spinners who supplied the labels with luxury fabrics and yarns and assisted in the development of innovative fabrications.”

More than 65 designers from more than 60 countries were nominated for this year’s award, with finalists representing six different regions around the world. The global finalists were SixLee and KYE (Asia), Blair Archibald and Harman Grubiša (Australia & New Zealand), Matthew Miller and Le Kilt (British Isles), L'Homme Rouge and David Laport (Europe), Antar-Agni and Bodice (Indian Subcontinent and Middle East) and DYNE and Zaid Affas (USA).

The menswear and womenswear winners will each receive AU$200,000 to help support the development of their business. They will also receive ongoing industry mentor support, Woolmark certification for their winning collection and the opportunity to be stocked in some of the world’s most prestigious department stores and boutiques, including Boutique 1, Boon The Shop, David Jones, Harvey Nichols, Hudson's Bay, Lane Crawford, LECLAIREUR, mytheresa.com, ORDRE, Parlour X, Ssense.com, Sugar and Tata CLiQ Luxury. The Innovation

Award winner will receive $100,000 along with commercial opportunities.

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Fuller Craft Museum Offers Free Pussyhats

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Fuller Craft Museum Offers Free Pussyhats for the Upcoming Boston/Cambridge Women’s March and Beyond.

The aim of The Pussyhat Project was to outfit enough participants with pink hats to create a collective visual statement of unity at the Women’s March on Washington—the now ubiquitous “sea of pink.” An equally important objective was to provide those who couldn’t attend a March the opportunity to be represented and to support women’s rights by making and gifting a hat to a marcher. In keeping with that spirit, Fuller Craft has partnered with curator Beth Miller to present a special “Gifting” installation within our exhibition Revolution in the Making: The Pussyhat Project (January 21 – May 20, 2018). While supplies last, hats will be available for visitors to take and wear in support of women’s equality and social justice for all.

In anticipation of the January 20 Boston/Cambridge Women’s March, Fuller Craft Museum has made special accommodations for visitors to take a hat in advance of the January 21 opening reception for Revolution in the Making. While Revolution in the Making will not be open until January 20, we will have the hats provided by Beth Miller available for the taking on January 18 and January 19 at Fuller Craft. The Pussyhats will be available (on a first-come-first-served basis from the special gifting installation only) at no cost for anyone wishing to wear the hat in the January 20 Boston/Cambridge Women's March. We will have the display set up in the Great Room for visitors who pay museum admission, and in addition, there will be a small number at the front desk for those who don't wish to pay for entry.

Miller explains, “These hats continue the energy of the Women’s March and validate women around the country who are committed to resist and persist. This special exhibition area welcomes interaction. Visitors are invited to choose a hat to take for their own future actions of resistance and to wear in support of women’s rights. This action will reignite the efforts of the hundreds of craftivists in this exhibit, while spreading solidarity and intention as these hats are taken out into the world in the next act of activism.”

Upcoming Exhibition-Related Programming

Opening Reception January 21, 2018 2:00 – 5:00 pm

3:00 pm Panel Discussion (included with Museum admission)

“Make Against the Machine: Needlecraft and the Resistance.” Panelists: Jayna Zweiman, the Pussyhat Project co-creator; Virginia Johnson, owner of Cambridge stitch-lounge Gather Here; Adrienne Sloane, local fiber artist and craftivist; Sue Bleiweiss, member of The Artist Circle Alliance and Threads of Resistance organizer. Moderator: Beth McLaughlin, Chief Curator, Fuller Craft Museum

Make a Difference, Craftivism Event

March 18, 2018 2:00 – 5:00 pm

3:00 pm Screening of “Women’s March: A Documentary Film about Democracy and Human Rights” produced by TrimTab Media. (Sponsored by RISE Sharon.) Join the museum for a day of craft activism and experience how the act of making can be used to affect social change. Free activities include a Pussyhat knit-in, cross-stitch affirmations, postcard writing, and other change making workshops. Craftivist kits will be available. All ages welcome.

For more information or to register, visit www.fullercraft.org or call us at 508.588.6000.

 

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Georgia O'Keeffe: Art, Image, Style

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The Peabody Essex Museum (PEM) presents one of America’s most iconic artists in a new light. Georgia O'Keeffe: Art, Image, Style is the first exhibition to explore O’Keeffe’s unified, modern aesthetic and distinctive self-styling by presenting her paintings with her never-before-exhibited handmade garments and photographs of the artist. Organized by the Brooklyn Museum and guest curator Wanda M. Corn, Robert and Ruth Halperin Professor Emerita in Art History, Stanford University, this critically-acclaimed, nationally touring exhibition is on view at PEM from December 16, 2017 through April 1, 2018.

“For more than 70 years, Georgia O’Keeffe shaped her public persona, defied labels and carved out a truly progressive, independent life in order to create her art,” says Austen Barron Bailly, organizing curator and PEM’s George Putnam Curator of American Art. “O’Keeffe recognized that how she dressed and posed for the camera could signal an alliance between her attire, her art, and her home. Her aesthetic legacy of organic silhouettes, minimal ornamentation and restrained color palettes continues to capture the popular imagination and inspire leading designers and tastemakers of today.”

Through 125 works, Georgia O'Keeffe: Art, Image, Style examines how the renowned artist adeptly crafted her image in the public eye. “O’Keeffe considered her clothed body as another canvas on which to proclaim her modernism,” says Bailly. “The exhibition expands our understanding of O'Keeffe, exploring how she expressed her identity and artistic values.” O’Keeffe’s androgynous persona, feminist outlook, stark fashion sense and skill as a seamstress combine to create a new understanding of her role as an artist and an individual.

Rejecting the staid Victorian world into which she was born, O’Keeffe absorbed the progressive principles of the Arts and Crafts Movement, which promoted the idea that everything a person made or chose to live with should reflect a unified and visually pleasing aesthetic. “O’Keeffe drew no line between the art she made and the life she lived,” notes guest curator Wanda M. Corn. “She strove to make her life a complete work of art, each piece contributing to an aesthetic whole.”

Throughout her life, O’Keeffe had strong opinions about how she wanted to look, no matter what the dress codes of the era dictated. O’Keeffe’s distinct aesthetic sensibility can be traced from her school age rebellion against prevailing feminine ornamentation; to her New York years in the 1920s and ‘30s when a black-and-white palette dominated much of her art and dress; to her later years in New Mexico, when her art and clothing changed in response to the Southwestern landscape. Whether sewn by O’Keeffe herself, custom made, or bought off the rack, she consistently favored the simple lines and abstract forms that also reverberated through her artwork and home design.

Photography played an enormous role in solidifying O’Keeffe as a pioneer of modernism as well as an immediately recognizable style icon. A multiyear, serial portrait project with her husband Alfred Stieglitz ultimately helped O’Keeffe become the most photographed American artist of the 20th century and contributed to a wider understanding of photography’s power to shape public image.

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Apri Ski...Without the Exercise

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This January, Publico Street Bistro & Garden, will transform its interior courtyard and garden space into The Lodge at Publico, a whimsical and cozy apres ski inspired pop up concept.  Open Friday’s and Saturdays from January through March, this winter oasis will be outfitted in oversized flannel blankets, plush pillows, modern, faux moose and deer heads, retro signage, skis, sleds and an artificial snow machine that creates a true alpine ambiance in the middle of Boston. No matter how low temps may drop, Publico’s new, state-of-the-art retractable roof will keep guests warm and toasty alongside the space’s roaring fire pits and heated alcoves.  The Publico team will be outfitted in their most fashionable ski gear behind the atrium bar while patrons will be encouraged to dress the part even if they haven’t hit the slopes.

Executive Chef, Keenan Langlois, has created a lodge-inspired menu of post slope bites that include; Triple Diamond Slope Sliders (aged cheddar, grilled onions, $10,) White Heat Fried Mac & Cheese (sweet habanero peppers, hominy, manchego cheese, $8,) Grilled Vermont Shreddar Cheese & Tomato Soup (country bread, Vermont cheddar, homemade tomato soup, $8,) Alpine Arancini (cheddar jack, parmesan, tomato, $8,) White Mountain Pizza (parmesan cream sauce, broccoli rabe, mozzarella, toasted garlic, chili, $12,) and the classic Pizza/French Fries combo (crushed tomato, mozzarella, basil, fries, $15.)

Co-owner and Beverage Director, Teodora Bakardzhieva will help to thaw out a winter’s chill with some hot cocktails to the likes of; Hot Toddy (Teeling Irish Whiskey, Pimento Dram, honey, lemon, $12,) Hot Buttered Rum (Bacardi 8, house butter batter, $12,) Spiked Hot Chocolate (Grey Goose, housemade cocoa, Aztec chocolate bitters, $12,) alongside a Winter’s Mule (Stoli Vodka, Craneberry liquer, ginger beer, mint, lime, $12.) a non-alcoholic Bunny Slope Hot Cocoa will also be available for those who wish to warm up but not imbibe.  The quintessential apres ski Shot-Ski’s will also be available for groups of four people ($40.00.)

Throughout the season, Guests can also expect a series of special events and programming to the tune of lift ticket and gear giveaways, screenings of the 2018 Winter Olympic Games which begin in February and a pop up DIY hot cocoa bar with a delicious spread of treats and toppings.  The Lodge at Publico will officially open on Friday, January 5th with a grand opening celebration and remain open Fridays and Saturdays only, through March from 6pm – 12am.  Reservations are recommended and can be made by calling the restaurant directly at 617.622.5700.

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Commitment, A Collection by Equinox

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Equinox, the high-performance lifestyle leader, today unveiled an unprecedented new take on its acclaimed “Commit To Something” campaign with “Commitment, A Collection by Equinox,” featuring seven one-of-a-kind luxury goods inspired by the passion and persistence of some of the most committed people and organizations on earth.

In an on-demand world where everything is a swipe away and anything can be bought if the price is right, Commitment, A Collection by Equinox was conceived to subvert our typical perceptions of luxury.  From “The Truth Lipstick” to “Eau de Blood, Sweat and Tears,” each product serves as beautiful proof of commitment in a noncommittal world.  The catch?  Nothing is for sale.

Designed by some of the world’s most provocative fashion forces including Off-White’s Virgil Abloh, Shayne Oliver, Y/Project and Eckhaus Latta, the products explore the real-life stories behind The Washington Post’s truth-seeking journalists, the gay civil rights pioneers of The Stonewall Inn, marathoner/activist Kathrine Switzer, and other fiercely committed people and organizations.

“The concept of commitment is central to the Equinox mission, and we proudly celebrate it every day as we empower each member of our community to maximize their own personal potential,” said Vimla Black Gupta, Chief Marketing Officer, Equinox Fitness Clubs. “We’re living in a time where commitment has become a relative rarity, so the stories we’re sharing as part of this year’s campaign feel especially important as a catalyst for inspiring others to accomplish their own goals—both inside and outside the four walls of our clubs.”

Commitment, A Collection by Equinox, developed in collaboration with Wieden+Kennedy New York, is further brought to life with Steven Klein-shot imagery that serves as an homage to classic luxury fashion advertising and an “e-commerce” hub, www.commitmentcollection.com, featuring interactive narratives on each product.

“As a brave brand, this year’s campaign pushes well beyond two-dimensional images to create deeper, narratives around the world’s most valuable resource—but nothing is as it seems,” said Elizabeth Nolan, Equinox Executive Creative Director. “‘Commit to Something’ has now evolved from a provocative idea into a cultural movement, so we’re inviting audiences on a meaningful journey to challenge their own definitions of luxury and its significance in their lives.”

Commitment, A Collection by Equinox is not for sale. Throughout 2018, several of the items from the collection will be auctioned off, with proceeds donated to nonprofit organizations of importance to the people and organizations behind each, including Equinox’s longtime charitable partners, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and The Heroes Project. In some cases, donations have been made to these organizations on Equinox’s behalf.

With designers curated by stylist Mel Ottenberg, Equinox commissioned the production of these one-of-a-kind items:

The Truth Lipstick: Made from blank newspaper pages from The Washington Post. Symbolizes the organization’s commitment to free press and journalistic integrity. Lipstick Case designed by Mel Ottenberg.

The Law Suit: Designed by Eckhaus Latta, and made from case files of lawyer James Thornton, founder of nonprofit ClientEarth who, over four decades, has committed to fighting for the environment because it can’t fight for itself.  Symbolizes Thornton’s commitment to solving the greatest challenges faced by our planet.

Stonewall Stilettos: Designed by Shayne Oliver, and made from the actual pleather from the banquettes at The Stonewall Inn.  Symbolizes the commitment of early activists fighting for LGBTQA rights.

The Shades of Humanity: Designed by Adam Selman, and made from the camera lens of 2016 Instagram photographer of the year, Ruddy Roye.  Symbolizes Ruddy Roye’s commitment to capturing the stories that often go unseen.

Eau De Blood, Sweat & Tears:  Bottle designed by Rafael de Cardenas/Architecture at Large with a custom scent by 12.29, the fragrance was infused with the actual DNA of Kathrine Switzer, the first woman to run the Boston Marathon.  Symbolizes Switzer’s commitment to equal rights for all female athletes.

The Scrubs Sweatsuit: Designed by Off-White’s Virgil Abloh, and inspired by the workwear of dedicated oncologists like those at Memorial Sloan Kettering, who patient by patient, are committed to fighting the war on cancer daily.

The Real Camo Jacket: Designed by Y/Project (Glenn Martens) and made using actual material from the uniforms of four Heroes Project veterans, celebrating our partnership with the Heroes Project.  Symbolizes The Heroes Project’s commitment to wounded veterans, who changes lives by empowering and enabling these veterans to climb the world’s seven summits. Materials donated by Charlie Linville (Jacket from his Battle Dress Uniform, including name patch, piece of his boot that he was wearing when he stepped on an IED and lost his leg, piece of rope that went to the top of Everest, belt buckle from dress uniform); Brad Ivanchan (belt when in combat); Carlos Torres (Jacket from his BDU’s, including his name patch); Kionte Storey (Bracelet from when he was in combat)

“I was really inspired to work on the Commitment project with Equinox this year,” said Ottenberg, who curated the collection’s designers.  “The commitment stories we worked with were so interesting and varied, and to be able to create different products with some of my favorite designers was such a fun and rewarding challenge.”

Beginning on January 2, Commitment, A Collection by Equinox will also appear on Equinox social channels featuring stories behind each of the products and using the hashtag #committosomething.  The products will also be displayed in select Equinox club windows nationwide as a nod to luxury retail shop displays.

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Commitment, A Collection by Equinox

Written by

Equinox, the high-performance lifestyle leader, today unveiled an unprecedented new take on its acclaimed “Commit To Something” campaign with “Commitment, A Collection by Equinox,” featuring seven one-of-a-kind luxury goods inspired by the passion and persistence of some of the most committed people and organizations on earth.

In an on-demand world where everything is a swipe away and anything can be bought if the price is right, Commitment, A Collection by Equinox was conceived to subvert our typical perceptions of luxury.  From “The Truth Lipstick” to “Eau de Blood, Sweat and Tears,” each product serves as beautiful proof of commitment in a noncommittal world.  The catch?  Nothing is for sale.

Designed by some of the world’s most provocative fashion forces including Off-White’s Virgil Abloh, Shayne Oliver, Y/Project and Eckhaus Latta, the products explore the real-life stories behind The Washington Post’s truth-seeking journalists, the gay civil rights pioneers of The Stonewall Inn, marathoner/activist Kathrine Switzer, and other fiercely committed people and organizations.

“The concept of commitment is central to the Equinox mission, and we proudly celebrate it every day as we empower each member of our community to maximize their own personal potential,” said Vimla Black Gupta, Chief Marketing Officer, Equinox Fitness Clubs. “We’re living in a time where commitment has become a relative rarity, so the stories we’re sharing as part of this year’s campaign feel especially important as a catalyst for inspiring others to accomplish their own goals—both inside and outside the four walls of our clubs.”

Commitment, A Collection by Equinox, developed in collaboration with Wieden+Kennedy New York, is further brought to life with Steven Klein-shot imagery that serves as an homage to classic luxury fashion advertising and an “e-commerce” hub, www.commitmentcollection.com, featuring interactive narratives on each product.

“As a brave brand, this year’s campaign pushes well beyond two-dimensional images to create deeper, narratives around the world’s most valuable resource—but nothing is as it seems,” said Elizabeth Nolan, Equinox Executive Creative Director. “‘Commit to Something’ has now evolved from a provocative idea into a cultural movement, so we’re inviting audiences on a meaningful journey to challenge their own definitions of luxury and its significance in their lives.”

Commitment, A Collection by Equinox is not for sale. Throughout 2018, several of the items from the collection will be auctioned off, with proceeds donated to nonprofit organizations of importance to the people and organizations behind each, including Equinox’s longtime charitable partners, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and The Heroes Project. In some cases, donations have been made to these organizations on Equinox’s behalf.

With designers curated by stylist Mel Ottenberg, Equinox commissioned the production of these one-of-a-kind items:

The Truth Lipstick: Made from blank newspaper pages from The Washington Post. Symbolizes the organization’s commitment to free press and journalistic integrity. Lipstick Case designed by Mel Ottenberg.

The Law Suit: Designed by Eckhaus Latta, and made from case files of lawyer James Thornton, founder of nonprofit ClientEarth who, over four decades, has committed to fighting for the environment because it can’t fight for itself.  Symbolizes Thornton’s commitment to solving the greatest challenges faced by our planet.

Stonewall Stilettos: Designed by Shayne Oliver, and made from the actual pleather from the banquettes at The Stonewall Inn.  Symbolizes the commitment of early activists fighting for LGBTQA rights.

The Shades of Humanity: Designed by Adam Selman, and made from the camera lens of 2016 Instagram photographer of the year, Ruddy Roye.  Symbolizes Ruddy Roye’s commitment to capturing the stories that often go unseen.

Eau De Blood, Sweat & Tears:  Bottle designed by Rafael de Cardenas/Architecture at Large with a custom scent by 12.29, the fragrance was infused with the actual DNA of Kathrine Switzer, the first woman to run the Boston Marathon.  Symbolizes Switzer’s commitment to equal rights for all female athletes.

The Scrubs Sweatsuit: Designed by Off-White’s Virgil Abloh, and inspired by the workwear of dedicated oncologists like those at Memorial Sloan Kettering, who patient by patient, are committed to fighting the war on cancer daily.

The Real Camo Jacket: Designed by Y/Project (Glenn Martens) and made using actual material from the uniforms of four Heroes Project veterans, celebrating our partnership with the Heroes Project.  Symbolizes The Heroes Project’s commitment to wounded veterans, who changes lives by empowering and enabling these veterans to climb the world’s seven summits. Materials donated by Charlie Linville (Jacket from his Battle Dress Uniform, including name patch, piece of his boot that he was wearing when he stepped on an IED and lost his leg, piece of rope that went to the top of Everest, belt buckle from dress uniform); Brad Ivanchan (belt when in combat); Carlos Torres (Jacket from his BDU’s, including his name patch); Kionte Storey (Bracelet from when he was in combat)

“I was really inspired to work on the Commitment project with Equinox this year,” said Ottenberg, who curated the collection’s designers.  “The commitment stories we worked with were so interesting and varied, and to be able to create different products with some of my favorite designers was such a fun and rewarding challenge.”

Beginning on January 2, Commitment, A Collection by Equinox will also appear on Equinox social channels featuring stories behind each of the products and using the hashtag #committosomething.  The products will also be displayed in select Equinox club windows nationwide as a nod to luxury retail shop displays.

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What NOT to Wear to the Ball

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We have a lot of fun here with out popular Fashion or Flop columns, so in an effort to make you avoid any fashion faceplants at The Resolution Ball or Back Bay Ball (the two most fashionable parties of the year), here are some examples of what NOT to wear on NYE.

        

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Think Outside the Tux

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As we’ve said before, guys going to The Resolution Ball or The Back Bay Ball have a pretty easy time when it comes to picking what to wear to impress their dates” Rent a tux or put on your best suit?

But what if you’ve waited until the last minute and the only tux left to rent is powder blue with a ruffled shirt and black velvet piping? Or if your ‘best suit’ is the one you’ve been wearing to job interviews for the past six months and still haven’t been hired?

You need some helpful hints. Here’s what we’ve found”

Esquire magazine offers a helpful article titled, How to Dress for Any Type of Party, although to be honest we barely even noticed John Legend in the lead photo thanks to the captivating charms of his wife, Chrissy Teigen. When you’ve stopped gawking, read the article nd then ask yourself, are you ready to “Embrace the Turtleneck”?

The Idle Man offers a handy guide to not only help you decide what kind of tux you should rent (James Bond NEVER wore powder blur to a casino), but also how to find a more casual look that fits your style with enough class to get you past the velvet ropes.

OutfitTrends.com offer 18 ideas for New Year’s Eve. It’s a pretty good list, but there’s still nothing that will ever convince us that velvet jackets are a good idea…ever.

And finally, if bringing in the New year makes you feel nostalgic for some vintage outfit, check out this fabulous video from thezoereport.com from 2015 that celebrates 100 Years of New Years Eve Fashion for men. Just ignore the 1935 guy wearing a velvet jacket.

 

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What Will You Wear to the Ball?

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Let’s face it, guys have it pretty easy when it comes to deciding what to wear to a big event like The Resolution Ball or the Back Bay Ball: They rent a tux or, if they have their own well turned out sense of fashion, wear their best suit.

Ladies can face a much bigger challenge trying to find just the right outfit that will make jaws drop while still be comfortable enough to dance the night away. It’s not an easy balance to strike and untl the day when women wear the tuxes and men have to find the right gown, here are some tips we found to help ladies make the right choice.

We will start with a slideshow we found on marieclaire.com which gives some unique options to help you finally forget about that LBD (Little Black Dress) you’ve come to depend on and start the ew year with a totally new look.

A site we found called Man Repeller (?) has a dun story about “Sparkly New Year’s Eve Outfits You Can Buy Super Last-Minute”. It’s not clear how dressing like a human glitter ball repels men, but shiny is always fun on the dance floor.

The Cosmopolitan website offers 50 New Year's Eve dresses you're going to LOVE..although after viewing all the options we can’t help but think that “love” is way to string a word for some of these outfits.

If you already know what dress you will be wearing, then be sure to check out this vogue article on “The 15 Chicest Hair Accessories to Finish Your New Year’s Eve Look” and then ask yourself, are you fashion brave enough to welcome in 2018 wearing a hairband?

And finally, refinery29.com offers an option for those who realize that  the middle of winter is no time to be wearing something sheer and short with “The Anti-Party Dress Guide To Wearing Pants On New Year's Eve”.

 

One final note: No matter what you wear, just remember that when you go to either The Resolution Ball or the Back Bay Ball the best looking think on you all night will be the smile on your face as you say goodbye to 2017 with your friends.

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